Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Life Is Like the Wind

Innes, Shona (Author)
Agócs, Írisz (Illustrator)
Barron’s 2014. 32 pages
First published: 2014
Series: A Big Hug
ISBN: 9780764167478 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 155.9
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

“Life is a little bit like the wind. We can’t see the wind, but we know when the wind is there.”

Written by a psychologist who presents a carefully thought-out analogy comparing life and the wind, this thoughtful treatise uses concise and poetic phrases and pencil and watercolour drawings to convey its message. The tone is inclusive, using “we” with the reader.

Rosy-cheeked animal characters of all kinds, from rabbits to ladybugs, are mostly shown in nature, under trees and amid flowers. Sometimes they are happy and lively, while at other times they are grieving or even dead. Like the wind, when life disappears, it goes somewhere else.

Readers learn of different ideas about life, death and grieving. All kinds of interpretations of and reactions to life and its end seem acceptable: “Some people like to spend time being kind to others.… And other people just like to spend time alone … thinking about how precious life is.”

This is a beautiful, gentle and life-affirming tool with which to broach the subject of death with readers.

  •  Discuss what happens to a person when they die. What happens to the life that is in them? Where does it go?
  •  

    Make a list of the suggested ways to mourn someone’s death. Illustrate your favourite and write the description underneath. How do you think you would mourn a friend or family member?

  •  

    The author says that life is like the wind. Discuss that image. Are there other images that come to mind regarding life and death?

  •  Discuss what happens to a person when they die. What happens to the life that is in them? Where does it go?
  •  Look at the cover page and make a prediction: What is this story about? Is the bunny sad? Happy? Hopeful? Something else?
  •  

    Make a list of the suggested ways to mourn someone’s death. For example, some people say prayers and talk to the person who died. How do you think you would mourn someone in your family or community?

  •  

    If you could ask questions of a person you knew who passed away, what would those questions be? Write them in a letter.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Ethics and Religious Culture