Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Leonardo the Terrible Monster

Willems, Mo (Author/Illustrator)
Disney/Hyperion Books 2005. 44 pages
First published: 2005
ISBN: 9780786852949 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Leonardo wishes he were scary but he just isn’t. He doesn’t have 1,642 teeth like Tony, he’s not weird like Hector, and he’s not big like Eleanor. So he devises a plan.

Funny cartoons of the cute, pot-bellied Leonardo animate dusty-toned blank backgrounds. Books pile around him, his tongue sticking out in effort, as he researches the most “scaredy-cat kid in the world” with plans to “scare the tuna salad out of him!” The language is bursting with fun. Ever more lengthy and complicated sentences culminate with the entire background filled with timid Sam’s real reasons for crying: an astoundingly run-on complaint, starting with “My mean big brother,” through “. . . cockatoo pooped on my head” and finally finishing with “and my tummy hurts!”

Young readers may not be surprised when Leonardo decides to give Sam a hug—learning something new about himself and making a friend in the process.

  •  Before reading the end of the story, predict what Leonardo will do.
  •  

    Discuss why Leonardo wanted to scare someone. What decision did he have to make when he met Sam? Why did he make that decision?

  •  

    Make a list of things that good friends might do for their friends.

  •  

    Write a story to include in a class book called The Adventures of Leonardo and Sam.

  •  Read along with the story.
  •  Predict, then discuss the ending. What did Leonardo learn about himself?
  •  

    Use a Venn Diagram to compare Leonardo with monsters from other stories.

  •  Sequence the chain of events that made Sam cry.
  •  

    Compile ideas for stories to include in a class book called The Adventures of Leonardo and Sam.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To solve problems
  • Citizenship and Community Life