Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Learn to Speak Film: A Guide to Creating, Promoting & Screening Your Movies

Kulak, Jeff (Illustrator)
Owlkids 2013. 96 pages
First published: 2013
Series: Learn to Speak
ISBN: 9781926973852 (paperback)
9781926973845 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 791.43
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

layout, multimodal, structures and features

Award

The Forest of Reading – The Silver Birch Award (Non-Fiction) Nominee – 2014

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

With “a little know-how and some basic equipment – not much more than a camera,” almost anyone can find their voice and make a movie. So begins this introductory guide to filmmaking, with tips, illustrations and instructions on choosing a camera, writing a screenplay, preparing a press kit and much more.

Part of a series offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at some of the more glamorous industries in the arts (including dance and fashion), the book favours a “less is more” approach, steering away from dense, overwhelming prose and offering just enough information to make it a practical, useful resource.

Organized into six chapters, the book never feels like a heavy read in spite of the wealth of information contained in its pages. A clean layout and hip, cool design features – varied font, bold graphics, lively sidebars, well-chosen quotes – package the material in bite-sized morsels that facilitate comprehension.

A friendly speech bubble at the beginning introduces readers to the author while a “Quick Search” index helps with easy navigation. This title will appeal to film buffs, budding filmmakers and anyone who has ever had the notion that an event in their lives could be fodder for the big screen.

  •  

    Discuss your favourite movies, giving reasons for your choices. Begin a list of features that make a film appealing. As you read, make connections between the filmmaking process and the appeal of the finished product.

  •  Use a graphic organizer to summarize the movie-making process. Use pictograms to describe the steps.
  •  

    Try a suggested activity such as experimenting with lighting in photography, keeping an idea journal.

  •  

    Choose a movie industry career for further research. Describe what the career entails and what education would be required. Explain why you would or would not like this job.

  •  Each section follows a similar structure, aiming to demystify various aspects of the film industry. Use an opening section as a model for reading the text and using its features.
  •  In small groups, discuss what makes a good film. Use information from the text to back up your ideas. Keep notes and compare them with other groups.
  •  Use the information you learned from the reading and discussions in a production process to create a short film on a topic of importance to teens. Share your work with peers and adults.
  •  

    Discuss the cover and back pages. Research jobs in the film industry. Explore pages 56-59 and compare the information there with your answers. What do you think are the steps in making a movie? Make an initial class list of these steps.

  •  

    With a partner, explore the book and use a graphic organizer to summarize the movie-making process. 

  •  

    Try one of the suggested activities (breaking down a scene into a storyboard or experimenting with lighting). Keep a note and idea journal.

  •  

    Use the sequential steps of movie-making to create a short ad for a favourite book. 

  •  

    Make a list of important media conventions. How do they help you navigate the text?

  •  

    You are a movie producer. Have a group discussion with other producers. List your favourite movies, giving reasons for your choices. Make connections between your choices and the key points from the book. Prepare index cards with relevant information to help you maintain the discussion.

  •  

    Review the production process steps (see ESL Secondary Progression of Learning) before making a short movie related to a previous class project. In the end credits, note the techniques you used to make your piece more engaging.

  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • To use information and communications technologies
  • Career Development
  • Visual Arts