Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

It’s a Book

Smith, Lane (Author/Illustrator)
Macmillan 2010. 32 pages
First published: 2010
ISBN: 9781596436060 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

recurring patterns

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Monkey is reading a book. His friend wants to know what it is.

The minimal language in the story is rich with quiet humour. Monkey remains stoic as he is pelted with questions by his friend: “Does it need a password? No. Need a screen name? No.” The graphic quality of the cartoon illustrations are softened by painterly texture in both the wide outlines and the flat, colour-filled areas.

In this story, the power of a good read is convincingly deployed against all the bells and whistles of media technology. Readers will identify with the fine qualities of Jackass’ laptop, yet also laugh at monkey’s long-suffering responses. Everyone can relate to the strength of Monkey’s argument: “Look.” as he shows his friend the suspenseful bit he’s reading. At first unimpressed, Jackass finds himself reaching for the book to find out what happens next. He reads. And reads. Finally Monkey asks for the return of the book, and it is refused. As Monkey heads off to the library, his friend promises to recharge the book when he’s finished with it. He’s told, “You don’t have to ... It’s a book, Jackass.”

  •  

    Compare texting language to the standard words used in books or magazines. Use the book as a springboard to discuss e-mail and Web etiquette.

  •  

    Write a letter in texting language and the same letter in regular words. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of both.

  •  

    Write a blog entry about a favourite book.

  •  Try reading all or part of a book on an e-reader. How does this experience differ from reading a hardcopy book? Why might some people prefer one over the other?
  •  

    Compare technology language to the standard words used in books and magazines. Use the book as a springboard discuss e-mail and Web etiquette.

  •  

    Write a letter in texting code (LOL, GTG) and the same letter in regular words—discuss the advantages and disadvantages of both.

  •  

    Make a poster of texting codes and shorthand that you and your friends could use to communicate in English. Don’t forget to write the meaning of the codes.

  •  

    Write a description of a favourite book using as many texting codes as you can. Share with a partner and discuss the results.

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To use information
  • To use information and communications technologies