Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

If You Give a Pig a Pancake

Bond, Felicia (Illustrator)
HarperCollins 1998. 32 pages
First published: 1998
ISBN: 9780060266868 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, recurring patterns, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

“If you give a pig a pancake, she’ll want some syrup to go with it. You’ll give her some of your favourite maple syrup. She’ll probably get all sticky, so she’ll want to take a bath. She’ll ask you for some bubbles . . .” The litany of requests snowballs until the pig has built a treehouse in a young girl’s yard which, of course, needs wallpapering. When the glue gets her all sticky the pig is reminded of the maple syrup, which gets her asking for another pancake.

This fast-paced tale, told in circular fashion, follows the zany consequences of a single action and builds on reader anticipation, which makes it an ideal choice for read-aloud. The simple, amusing text is accompanied by loads of visual humour, including silly, colourful illustrations of the endearing pig on her back slurping up the sticky pancakes or tap dancing in a sweater that is much too long for her. The artwork eloquently captures the pig’s sheepish expressions as the obliging girl becomes more and more crazed by the demands.

As a classroom tool, the book could be used to introduce context clues, reading between the lines and prediction, or as a springboard to discussion about future events.

  •  

    Introduce the word fiction. List the reasons why this book is fictional. What would a pig be doing in a non-fiction book? Create a Venn diagram illustrating the differences and similarities.

  •  

    Discuss the reasons why the girl doesn’t get mad. How do you react to being told what to do? Would you prefer to be the girl or the pig in the story? Explain why.

  •  

    Choose a farm animal and list the reasons why it would make a great pet. Outline how you would take care of it in your current home.

  •  

    Write a collaborative class book about a different animal. What kind of mischief could your animal get into? Brainstorm different scenarios and record the suggestions, for inclusion in your story.

  •  

    As the story is read aloud, continue to predict what the pig will ask for next.

  •  

    Create a circular diagram (with illustrations) to recount key events from the story. What happens when you give a pig a pancake? What happens next? 

  •  

    Draw your favourite scene from the story and include a caption.

  •  

    Compare two stories from the same author using a Venn diagram. What is similar and what is different?

  •  

    Create your own version of a circular story using the story as a model and a circular story planning tool. Read it to a peer.

  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To communicate appropriately
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities