Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

If You Give a Mouse a Cookie

Bond, Felicia (Illustrator)
HarperCollins 2010. 32 pages
First published: 1985
ISBN: 9780060245863 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, recurring patterns, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

When a boy gives a mouse a cookie, it leads to a succession of consequences—serving, fetching things for and cleaning up after the energetic little creature. Varied language and situations convey the repetitions with verve: “If you give a mouse a cookie, he’s going to ask for a glass of milk. When you give him the milk, he’ll probably ask you for a straw.”

Strong lines define the forms of the cute characters and their settings. Fine markings create subtle textures. Humour abounds as an exhausted mouse drapes himself over a tipped container of cleanser. Water floods the background, and a rubber glove floats among the suds. In another image, clouds of talcum emanate from a powder puff as it is fluffed to make a mouse-pillow. The increasingly harried boy carries many items for the mouse’s needs; his pockets burst with more. Scotch tape flies from his grasp as he teeters on a desk.

Children will love it when the hijinks come full circle, and the thirsty mouse asks for a glass of milk. Of course, “he’s going to want a cookie to go with it.”

  •  

    Discuss the concept of a circular story.

  •  

    Play a matching game using cards printed with causes and effects taken from the story.

  •  

    Draw elements from the story to use as props, then retell it using the props. (Velcro or magnets may help.) This could be performed for a younger audience.

  •  

    Play a matching game using cards printed with causes and effects taken from the story.

  •  

    Use a cause and effect graphic organizer to show your understanding of story.

  •  Write a circular story (on your own or with a partner) after brainstorming the elements. A graphic organizer may help you get started. You may want to limit the number of elements. 
  • To communicate appropriately
  • To cooperate with others
  • To solve problems
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Drama
  • Mathematics
  • Visual Arts