Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

I Touch

PatrickGeorge (Author/Illustrator)
PatrickGeorge 2013. 32 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9781908473080 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 612.8
Book type: Non-Fiction

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

“I Touch ...” is the starting phrase that leads early readers on an exploration. Each page offers a new, highly touchable notion: “... a sticky web ... slippery soap ... hot sand.” This book also provides an excellent model for using adjectives, and children may be encouraged to invent their own constructions—from experience, such as a squishy peanut butter sandwich—or their imaginations, such as a smooth mermaid’s tail.

Bright graphic images convey meaning with simple shapes, flat colour and clever composition. One stunning spread shows a fat pencil stub held between two giant fingers: “... a soft eraser” and “... a sharp point. Ouch!” In others, children will enjoy hunting for the hidden hands and fingers. They’ll love flipping the occasional plastic overlay that carries the visual story between images: hedgehog prickles to a dog’s nose, and a kiss to a rosy cheek. In the end, this simple discussion is broadened to include other creatures’ sense of touch: attentive readers will notice the cat’s whiskers form the shape of hands, while the elephant’s trunk is also a finger.

This is a fun, clever book for exploring our bodies, language and visual literacy.

  •  

    Start a class anchor chart about touch. Headings could include Things We Like (Don’t Like) to Touch or Touch Vocabulary. Brainstorm ideas before you read and again afterward.

  •  Look for hidden fingers throughout the story. Mark them with a flag or sticky note.
  •  

    Make a class sensory box. Bring in objects with as many different textures as possible. Use adjectives to describe the objects.

  •  

    Write a class Touch book in a similar style. Draw pictures or take photographs to illustrate your book. Use as many different adjectives as you can.

  •  

    Reread the book. Think of new nouns to create a new story (fluffy sweater, sticky glue, etc.).

  •  

    Make a class sensory box. Bring in objects with as many different textures as possible. Use adjectives to describe the objects.

  •  

    Write a class Touch book in the same style. Draw pictures or take photographs to illustrate it.

  •  

    Collect action words that involve the use of your hands (touch, point, clap, grab, etc.). Prepare an anchor chart for your classroom and keep adding to it.

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To use creativity
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Science and Technology