Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

How to Create Animation in 10 Easy Lessons

Bishop-Stevens, Will (Author/Illustrator)
Quarto 2016. 64 pages
First published: 2016
Series: Super Skills
ISBN: 9781633221826 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 741.5
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

One of the Super Skills series, this spiral-bound book on animation technique builds 10 key skills in a detailed step-by-step fashion. Each lesson goes into just enough detail to practise the skill, beginning with drawing and filming flip books and progressing to stop-motion using toys and Claymation. Exploring essentials like lighting, framing, sound effects and sets, this comprehensive yet easy-to-read volume provides in-depth information on making original animation; 2D and digital animation, editing and cameras are also covered, as is troubleshooting for common problems.

Clearly laid out chapters are broken down into smaller sections within each heading, allowing for skill building in a progressive and easy-to-follow manner. In “Make a Flip Book Loop,” there are instructions to draw and photograph frames, try different frame rates and capture resolution. The writing has a straightforward and reassuring tone: “Think back on how you made the blob jump (page 25) crouching down and stretching up as you jump. Jump around to get a feel for what your own body looks like when you jump.”

Page layouts are easy on the eye, using engaging fonts, plenty of white space and lively colourful graphic illustrations that bring examples of the work to life. “Handy Tips” leap out in coloured circles and bulleted “What you Need” lists are framed in pale blue boxes.

This accessible yet detailed volume on how to master the skills of animation includes resources, a glossary and an index at the back.

  •  Watch some teacher-selected examples of kid-created animation. Discuss the styles and techniques that you like.
  •  

    Try the invisible skateboard pixilation activity (pages 12-13). Share your results with different groups and give constructive feedback.

  •  

    Create the storyboard for an animation you would like to do. Build the set and select appropriate figurines or hand-made characters. Use tips from the book in creating your film.

  •  

    Have a movie festival to enjoy each other’s work. As animation professionals, discuss the tips and techniques you used.

  •  

    Write reviews of the films your classmates produce. Publish them on a class blog or in a newsletter.

  •  

    Explore the book's structures and features. Take a look at the content: which techniques would you like to try? What challenges do you expect to face?

  •  

    Create the storyboard for an animation you would like to do. Consider recreating a picture book story or a fairy tale, or craft an original story.

  •  

    With a partner, follow the instructions to create an animation. Make tests with or without the handy tips or “Wow” factors. Discuss the different results.

  •  

    Create an anchor chart that will help others use the skill you practised.

  •  Have a movie festival to enjoy each other’s work. As animation professionals, discuss the tips and techniques used.
  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To communicate appropriately
  • To construct his/her identity
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Drama
  • Science and Technology
  • Visual Arts