Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

How Do We Measure Matter?

Peppas, Lynn (Author)
Crabtree 2013. 24 pages
First published: 2013
Series: Matter Close-Up
ISBN: 9780778707752 (paperback)
9780778707684 (hardcover)
9781427190543 (e-book)
Original language: English
Dewey: 530
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

“Matter can be a solid such as Earth. It can be a liquid such as a lake. It can also be a gas such as the air we breathe.” This non-fiction picture book does an excellent job of explaining basic terminology and concepts, on topics such as “Measuring and collecting data,” “Units of measure” and the measurement of temperature, volume, mass and size.

An abundance of attractive photographs illustrate the concepts with everyday objects such as household measuring cups, tomatoes, bottles and cartons. Also shown are images of children interacting with scales, rulers and more.

“What do you think?” sidebars pose fun, illustrated questions for practice and discussion. One sidebar shows a kitten tucked between a straight ruler and a stack of bananas: “Which measuring tool—the bananas or the ruler—will tell your online friend in Mexico how tall your cat really is?”

The final segments introduce charts and graphs and how to read them. Back material offers resources for further reading, a glossary and an index.

  •  

    Examine the cover, table of contents and glossary. Discuss what you know about matter and measurement.

  •  

    As the book is read, discuss which math and science concepts and grammar conventions you need to know to discuss these topics effectively.

  •  Try out some of the measurements and come up with examples of your own.
  •  

    Discuss the “What do you think?” boxes. Use the appropriate language as suggested in the book.

  •  

    With a partner, choose a measurement project. Use one of the graphs to share your results.

  •  

    Examine the cover and the table of contents. Discuss what you know about this topic. How does the glossary help you understand what the book is about?

  •  

    As the book is read, discuss which math and science concepts and grammar conventions you need to know to discuss these topics.

  •  Try out some of the measurements and discuss the “What do you think?” boxes. Use the appropriate language suggested in the book.
  •  With a partner, choose a measurement project. Use one of the graphs to share your results.
  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To communicate appropriately
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Personal and Career Planning
  • Mathematics
  • Science and Technology