Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Hate That Cat

Creech, Sharon (Author)
HarperCollins 2010. 152 pages
First published: 2008
ISBN: 9780061430947 (paperback)
9780061430923 (hardcover)
9780061828935 (e-book)
Original language: English
Book type: Novel

Text Elements:

dialogue, point of view, recurring patterns, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

In this companion to Love That Dog, schoolboy Jack picks up where he left off the previous year, finding his voice through poetry and teaching readers a lot about literary devices in the process. Delighted again to have the awesome Miss Stretchberry as his teacher, Jack is no longer afraid to call himself a poet. This time, however, the subject matter for his poems involves a fat, black neighbourhood cat that he can’t stand as well as the relationship he has with his hearing-impaired mother.

The book works well as either a sequel or a stand-alone. All the poems referenced by Jack (by Tennyson, Eliot and others) are included in an appendix at the end, followed by a useful bibliography for teachers titled “Books on the Class Poetry Shelf.”

Through playful font and strategic text placement, Creech infuses Jack’s poetry with a likeable, authentic voice to which school-aged readers will easily connect.

It’s an excellent kid-friendly choice for introducing or complementing a poetry unit, or to be read independently or as a class.

  •  What is a poem? Are there different styles of poetry writing?
  •  With a partner, compare the poems at the end of the book with the poems in which Jack quotes them. What do you notice?
  •  

    Writers often use the words of other writers in their texts. Discuss what you think about this. Is it something that you would encourage others to do?

  •  

    Jack loves a certain poem and is inspired to write another poem in the same style. Choose a poem that has moved you and write one of your own in the same style.

  •  

    As a class, create a T-chart of reasons to love or hate a cat. Discuss your chart.

  •  

    Find one great example of each of the following: alliteration, assonance, onomatopoeia, simile, metaphor. Go on the hunt alone, then share your examples with your team. 

  •  

    Jack changes his mind about cats. Write a poem, in any style you choose, explaining how you changed your mind about something because of someone you cared about.

  •  

    Are you a dog person or a cat person? In a small group, discuss which animal makes a better pet.

  •  As you read, watch for the catalysts in Jack’s life that make him change his mind about animals, poetry and family.
  •  

    Write a free verse poem, as Jack, about how he feels about Miss Stretchberry and why.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To use information
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Media Literacy
  • Social Sciences