Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Hail! Ancient Greeks

Green, Jen (Author)
Crabtree 2011. 32 pages
First published: 2011
Series: Hail! History
ISBN: 9780778766308 (paperback)
9780778766230 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 938
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

layout, multimodal, setting, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Many of the ancient Greeks’ beliefs, activities, creations and mores were foundational for Western culture. Presented in a visual and textual style that evokes a sensationalistic news publication, this book features information on the Greeks’ theological system, democracy and medical knowledge at the time, among other topics. This historical tabloid’s language is anchored in the present, as if the ancient Greeks were running for office (“They say I’m a bit of a stickler,” reads a faux-electoral poster that invites us to “Vote for Draco”); leading a tour of a private home in the “Style Story” section; showcasing Alexander the Great in a “Celeb Profile;” offering an exclusive interview with Hippocrates (“Doc Hipp”), who confesses the “secret” of his success. The book does convey historical information and data, but it is couched in light-hearted news items and insets.

Each page is replete with screaming headlines, brightly coloured text, and boxes that mimic torn-out newspaper articles, advertisements, quizzes, scrolls, and so on. The many photographs depict statues, architecture and objects, alongside illustrated renderings of battles, baths or boats. For instance, a promotion for “Ares Outfitter” (“For all your combat gear”) includes a photograph of a crested Spartan helmet and a picture of a presumably ancient Greek suit of armour.

The book also includes a glossary, suggestions for further reading and online consultation, and a timeline (2200 BCE–30 BCE).

  •  

    Brainstorm what you know about ancient Greece. Start a mind map of this information and make adjustments as you read.

  •  

    As you read, identify events that have influenced modern day civilization.

  •  

    Read a more traditional non-fiction text and note its structures and features. Do the same with a tabloid magazine and this book. Make a 3-circle Venn diagram and determine what is common and unique to the three texts.

  •  

    Use what you have learned about structures and features of text to create your own tabloid on a subject of your choice. Imitate the style of the books and include such things as sensational events and splashy advertisements.

  •  

    Brainstorm what you know about ancient Greece. Start a mind map of this information and make adjustments as you read.

  •  Explore the structures and features of this book. What features can you use to find the information? Discuss how the information is presented.
  •  

    As you read, identify the events that have influenced our civilization.

  •  

    Compare and contrast how the information is presented in different books and on teacher-selected websites about Ancient Greece.

  •  

    In a small group, share your knowledge of ancient Greece (around 500 BCE). What do you know about ancient Greek politics, mythology, innovations, diet, architecture and athletics? Complement this knowledge with some light research. Discuss your most impressive findings.

  •  

    Skim the titles and images, and predict what each section will be about. Verify your predictions while reading.

  •  

    In a group, create a similar magazine about another ancient civilization. Where possible, use the same topics and magazine features.

  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To communicate appropriately
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Media Literacy
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Social Sciences