Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

George and the Dragon

Wormell, Christopher (Author/Illustrator)
Penguin Random House 2003. 32 pages
First published: 2002
ISBN: 9780099417668 (paperback)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This story starts with imposing scenes of a dragon’s terrible deeds. Lush watercolours depict panoramic landscapes, dominated by the great, red dragon. In one image, flames shoot across the spread toward a stone castle on a hilltop. In another, an army of mounted knights fall under the dragon’s feet. The language is equally portentous. The dragon flies “higher than the clouds,” and destroys with “a blast of his fiery breath.”

But both image and language turn intimate and humorous, as George the mouse moves into the crevice next to the dragon’s lair. Bold colours change to beige, ochre and soft, purple shadows, as George makes the best of his uncomfortable new abode. When he tries to borrow sugar from his neighbour, the startled dragon drops his captive princess: “‘AAAAAAAAAGH!’ screamed the dragon. And fled. ‘Oh, blow,’ groaned George. ‘No tea, then.’”

That we all have our fears, no matter how strong we seem, is the sweet, fun takeaway from this delightful homage to the story of Saint George and the dragon. Final scenes show the grateful princess hosting her mouse rescuer at a castle feast, while the dragon cowers behind a distant mountaintop.

  •  

    Use a Venn diagram to compare dragons and mice. Add ideas as you read.

  •  

    Describe the actions that are portrayed in the illustrations. How do they enhance the story?

  •  How does the illustrator use the page layout differently to portray the dragon versus the mouse? Look for and share other books in your classroom library where the illustrator uses the page layout to accommodate the subject.
  •  Retell the story from the point of view of the princess.
  •  

    Examine the cover and listen to a teacher-selected web version of the story of Saint George. Make predictions about the story.

  •  Compare the story of Saint George with George’s story. Use a Venn diagram to show the similarities and differences.
  •  

    Discuss and research the meanings of new words and expressions. Take notes in your personal dictionary.

  •  

    In small groups, retell the story by re-enacting it.

  •  

    Does the dragon make you feel uneasy or frightened? What are you afraid of and how do you cope? What techniques can you share to help someone feel more confident? Make a class poster or book of tricks to help everyone feel secure.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To use information
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Drama
  • Geography, History and Citizenship