Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Frog Song

Spirin, Gennady (Illustrator)
Macmillan 2013. 36 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9780805092547 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 597.8
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

figurative language, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Since the time of the dinosaurs, frogs have serenaded the earth with their unique music. The Midwife Toad and Darwin’s Frog are just two of 11 species of frogs and toads from around the world that are profiled here. Learn about their habitats, their birthing methods and the role that moisture plays in their lives.

Mimicking frog sounds, onomatopoeic words are set apart in assorted bold fonts, making for a lively read-aloud experience. Readers will yearn to chime in with the croaks, ribbits and plonks interwoven into the richly poetic prose. In the rain forest of Costa Rica, “the strawberry poison dart frog trills a tiny tune in a pile of wet leaves. PSSST-PSSST.”

Endpapers depict lifelike frogs in their natural habitat, surrounded by blooms, ferns, water grasses and lily pads. Finely detailed full-bleed paintings capture the vitality and vulnerability of each species.

When a song goes missing, “the silence is a warning” of environmental trouble, the author writes in the final pages of this fascinating account. Back matter provides more information on the featured frogs. There is also an author’s note with a call to action, a bibliography and a list of websites for budding biologists wishing to deepen their understanding.

  •  

    Describe what you see on the endpapers. How many frogs can you spot? What do you know about frogs?

  •  

    As you read, refer to a world map and label referenced locations with the name and a sketch of a frog found there.

  •  

    Notice the author’s use of onomatopoeias. Start an ongoing list of these words. Experiment with expression as you read them aloud. 

  •  

    Choose one of the frog species for further research. Share your findings.

  •  

    Read the postscript section, “Frogs in Trouble.” Create a poster or media presentation about the importance of preserving frog habitats.

  •  

    Go for a picture walk and notice the artwork. Discuss the similarities and differences between the frogs and their habitats.

  •  

    List words related to frogs. With a partner, decide on a way to organize these words. Sort them in a mind map, adding in your own knowledge.

  •  

    Investigate frogs that live in your area. Choose one and write an informative paragraph in the author’s style.

  •  

    Add labelled sticky notes to a world map, indicating where the various frogs originate.

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To solve problems
  • To use information
  • To use information and communications technologies
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Science and Technology