Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Friendship Is Like a Seesaw

Innes, Shona (Author)
Agócs, Írisz (Illustrator)
Barron’s 2014. 32 pages
First published: 2014
Series: A Big Hug
ISBN: 9780764167485 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

figurative language, point of view

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Using direct teaching language, this book defines aspects of friendship: “When things are balanced, both friends feel happy.”

Extremely engaging illustrations draw readers into the drama behind the rational language, with sketchy images featuring a cast of adorable animal friends. The opening spread depicts a birthday party. A dozen animal characters gather around the badger, their rough-sketched bodies twisting with excitement. Watercolour washes in clear, light tones reflect the happy mood of the moment.

These animal friends act out a variety of scenarios in a way that’s sure to hold youngsters’ attention. In one stormy image, the owl sits perilously close to the end of a downward-tilting branch. “Sometimes … you might feel bad about the friendships.” In another, the rabbit scowls at his friend, one tiny paw lifted to exclude him from a card game.

Through this clever teamwork, a rich range of emotional expression is portrayed as the language helpfully defines emotions and offers suggestions for getting on track: “Sometimes we might need to stop and check if our own friendship skills are working.” An author’s note to parents and teachers is included in this wise, enjoyable book.

  •  

    Start a class anchor chart of do’s and don’ts for being a good friend. Add to the list as you read.

  •  Draw a picture that incorporates a seesaw and an idea about friendship. Assemble your illustrations to create a class book on friendship.
  •  Read one of the companion books about friendship. Make connections between the events in the story and the ideas in this book.
  •  

    Brainstorm and list the features of a friendship. Write a class definition of friendship.

  •  

    In small teams, compare how friendship can be balanced or unbalanced. On a T-chart, give a variety of examples of both.

  •  

    Read other books involving friendships and identify the types of relationships. Are they balanced? Do they change?

  •  

    Write about a friendship, giving examples of times when it is balanced, and times when it is not balanced.

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To construct his/her identity
  • To cooperate with others
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To solve problems
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Ethics and Religious Culture