Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Frank and Laverne

Whamond, Dave (Author/Illustrator)
Stokes, Jennifer (Author)
Owlkids 2016. 40 pages
First published: 2016
ISBN: 9781771471459 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, point of view

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

There are two sides to every story. In this hilarious tale, readers get to hear both. Frank, a friendly pug, walks us through his week, detailing his determination to protect his beloveds: the humans in his family and Laverne, the cat.

“Monday 05:00 hours” Frank relates, military style. “Squirrel Patrol extra early this morning. I like to be up with the humans as they get ready to go out … My job: to be underfoot.”

Flip the book over and hear about the same week—from Laverne’s perspective. Comedy lies in the contrast between these two viewpoints which, in turn, diverge from the human outlook. Laverne’s ideal Monday (or every day) involves sleeping in. “Frank woke me extra early this morning,” she groans.

Meanwhile, Frank’s love goes unrequited. Hearts bubble up each time he pictures Laverne, whose total displeasure is captured by cartoonish watercolours. “He has no respect for my morning schedule,” she whines in a side-splitting scene that shows her furiously typing on a computer: “10 am: Nap / 10:30 am: Knead cat bed / 10:32 am: Nap.”

In the end, Frank and Laverne have at least one thing in common: their respective sense of being in charge. “There are four humans who live in my house,” explains Laverne, humorously dispelling any illusions people might have about pet-ownership.

  •  

    Brainstorm the characteristics of dogs and cats. Why do some people prefer a dog? Or a cat?

  •  

    Make a Venn diagram to clarify how the characters of the cat and the dog are similar and different.  What can you learn from synthesizing your ideas like this?

  •  

    Think of a situation/personal experience that connects to the relationship between the dog and the cat. In your reader-writer’s notebook, explain how this connection helps you understand relationships.

  •  

    Reread and consider how changing the point of view of the story had a deep impact on the way the story is told. Choose another story, perhaps a fairy tale, and retell the story from a different character’s point of view.

  •  

    Explore the cover and the story illustrations. How is this book similar to or different from other books you know?

  •  

    Write a timeline of the two different stories. Compare them to see how they are similar or different, depending on the point of view.

  •  

    Think of a situation in your life, at school or at home. Ask another person to tell you the story of how it happened. Use a Venn diagram to show how the two points of view are similar and different.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Ethics and Religious Culture