Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Follow the Moon Home

So, Meilo (Illustrator)
Chronicle Books 2016. 44 pages
First published: 2016
ISBN: 9781452112411 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 597.92
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

setting, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

While working on a class assignment to find a problem in the community, Vivienne explores her new neighbourhood and discovers something at the beach: “When baby turtles hatch, they follow the strongest light they see.” The beach houses’ lights are causing the turtles to head away from the sea.

Vivienne and her class start a “Lights out for Loggerheads” campaign to raise awareness and convince beach house renters to turn off their lights at night. They print fact sheets about the turtles and organize a bake sale to cover the printing costs.

The illustrations are done in vibrant watercolours, with playful splotches and washes. One page features the silhouettes of Vivienne, her mother and their dogs on the beach at dusk. The delicate colours of the sand and water wash together, while the beach houses glow in a scene that is both beautiful and deadly. Another page shows the class brainstorming. The scene vibrates with excitement, exploding with colourful pencils, books and clothing.

The text is dynamic and mature without being complex. It follows the students’ journey from Vivienne’s initial realization to when the turtles hatch and head toward the sea: “We stood together, smiling and silent with wonder. Then, just like the turtles, we followed the moon home.”

This true account is an inspiring example of youth making a difference. Following the story is a “letter to young activists” which describes five steps for creating change: Identify, plan, take action, think back, tell your story.

  •  

    What does it mean to be a responsible citizen in a community? Discuss your role in making your community better.

  •  Look at the structures and features of text, specifically the use of fonts and colours to create emphasis and meaning. Discuss how and why the author crafted the text in this way.
  •  Tell the story from the baby turtles’ point of view. Consider their hopes, dreams and fears in a world with large humans and cruel predators.
  •  

    Design your own Community Action Project. Read the “Letter to Young Activists” and follow through. Identify: Find a problem to solve (use your eyes, ask questions). Plan: Gather information and figure out what to do. Take action: Put your ideas into action. Reflect: Think about what you did and what you might do next. Tell the story: Show how you—and we—can make a difference.

  •  

    Go for a picture walk. Discuss the characters, emotions and setting. Make predictions about the story. Observe the coloured fonts. Why do you think the author made this choice?

  •  

    The students are taking summer school classes. Should summer school be implemented in your community? Come up with arguments both for and against the idea.

  •  

    As the story is read aloud, discuss how the students are engaged in a common project. What tools do they have and what steps do they take to carry out their project?

  •  

    Find a problem to solve in your community. As Mr J. says, "use your own eyes and ask questions." Follow the process in the book to see if you can solve the problem.

  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To solve problems
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Science and Technology