Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Face to Face With Grizzlies

Sartore, Joel (Author)
National Geographic Society 2009. 32 pages
First published: 2007
Series: Face to Face
ISBN: 9781426304743 (paperback)
9781426300509 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 599.784
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

character, multimodal, setting, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

“This was my third day on assignment for National Geographic magazine. It was the first day I thought I might not live through the job.” Behind-the-scenes details and anecdotes lend excitement to the adorable, intimidating and dramatic images in this book. Young bears fight over territory in a salmon stream; one bear naps, paw over eyes; a massive male stares into the camera.

Simple language expounds on basic facts about bear habits (“brown bears are omnivorous…. They’re not picky. Just hungry”), the yearly cycle (“In the spring, look for bears feeding on tender new grasses”) and bear-habitat conservation (“Grizzlies cannot find much food on the tops of snow- and ice-covered peaks…. The valleys are becoming built up with houses.”) Fun sidebars emphasize adventurous aspects of bear-study: “How to Not Get Eaten by a Grizzly,” “How to Collar a Bear” and “Don’t Feed the Bears.” Information-rich captions offer easy access to the text.

Back material includes a bear-habitat map, a glossary and lively “Research & Photographic Notes” for more information on the author’s process.

  •  

    Discuss what you see on a picture walk. Identify the structures and features (photos, glossary, index, sidebars, etc.) How do these help readers locate information?

  •  

    Compare facts about grizzlies with details about a few bears from picture books. How are they similar or different? Use a graphic organizer to share your findings.

  •  Discuss how bears are important in the ecosystem and what we can do to protect them.
  •  

    Use the “Facts at a glance” page as a model to write about a favourite animal.

  •  

    After reading, consider the characteristics needed to be a bear photographer or bear biologist. With a partner, compare these characteristics to those needed for other occupations of your choice.

  •  

    Draw a character map of what you think is needed to be a bear photographer or bear biologist. As you read, adjust the information using a different colour.

  •  

    Use a KWL chart to note your prior knowledge (K) and the questions you have about bears (W). As you learn more, fill in the (L) section.

  •  

    As you read, take note of interesting information about bears and write out fact cards. Create a game with these cards.

  •  Discuss how bears are important in the ecosystem and what we can do to protect them.
  •  

    Compare facts about grizzlies with details about a few bears from picture books. How are they similar or different? Use a graphic organizer to share your findings.

  •  

    Use resources to discover a unique or fascinating fact about grizzly bears. Pair up and try to guess your partner’s fact by asking yes/no questions only.

  •  

    While you read, take note of information about grizzlies that surprises you, then share this with a partner. Were your answers similar?

  •  

    In a group, design and create a board game that incorporates the information you read about grizzlies. Be sure to write up the rules that go with the game.

  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To communicate appropriately
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Science and Technology