Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Every Day Is Malala Day

Second Story Press 2014. 32 pages
First published: 2014
ISBN: 9781927583319 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

character, point of view

Award

The Forest of Reading – The Silver Birch Express Award Nominee – 2015

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

“You still wanted to learn. You spoke up for yourself and other girls too.” With a few simple, powerful sentences, this brief book accomplishes a great deal. It tells the story of a young girl who insisted on receiving an education—almost at the cost of her life. It shows the impact of this story on other girls around the world. It highlights the sad fact that Malala’s story is not unique.

“The first time I heard about you was such a terrible day.” Each statement is accompanied by a large photo of a child, or children, in different parts of the world. Some of these images are beautifully shot, some have editorial impact, and many combine the two. In one image, a young girl stands in a threadbare room, barefoot in her wedding dress and veil. Another shows a schoolgirl, arms crossed, as if challenging the camera: “You have shown the world that these things will not stop you.”

The book finishes with excerpts from Malala Yousafzai’s speech to the United Nations Youth Assembly in 2013. The acknowledgements provide information about the book. This is a tremendous resource for discussion about girls’ rights and children’s rights.

  •  

    Turn to “We are raising our hands with you . . . .” What does this mean? Discuss the symbolic significance of this gesture.

  •  

    Malala won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014. Learn more about her contributions to children’s rights. Write her a thank you letter for all her efforts.

  •  

    Identify the reasons why it’s still hard for some girls to get an education. Discuss the importance of getting an education and what that means for children in underdeveloped countries.

  •  

    Canadian brothers Craig and Mark Kielburger are co-founders of Free the Children and Me to We. What beliefs do they share with Malala? Why is it important to be aware of how children are living around the world? Create a poster advertising the importance of children’s rights.

  •  

    Discuss what you notice about the pictures. Compare them to your own life and situation. Discuss the girls’ messages and photographs in light of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

  •  

    On a map, pinpoint the countries mentioned in the book. 

  •  

    Malala says: “I raise up my voice—not so that I can shout, but that those without a voice can be heard.” Discuss and come to an understanding of the meaning of this sentence. Who in your community would be “those without a voice”? How could you help them find their voice?

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To cooperate with others
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Geography, History and Citizenship