Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Elephants

Riggs, Kate (Author)
Creative Editions 2011. 24 pages
First published: 2011
Series: Amazing Animals
ISBN: 9780898125634 (paperback)
Original language: English
Dewey: 599.67
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This appealing introduction to elephants, the “largest land animals in the world,” will intrigue young readers.

The attractive book features quality large-size photos in a spacious design grid. Each spread offers a basic fact about elephants in large type. A built-in glossary allows readers to check the definitions of words such as “continents,” “crops” and “predators” on the same page as they appear in the text.

Gorgeous photographs of elephants in the wild are captioned with further tidbits of information such as “Mothers and calves may ‘hold hands’ with their trunks”, and “Mud cools elephants on hot days and keeps bugs away.” Curious children will enjoy seeing elephants up close and in their glory; they’ll learn about elephant species and habitats. They’ll even learn how the elephant got his long trunk—at least according to writer Rudyard Kipling.

Back material includes further resources and a brief index. This simple book will be enjoyed by youngsters interested in wildlife and natural science.

  •  Discuss the characteristics of elephants. Create a Venn diagram comparing elephants in Asia and Africa.
  •  

    Based on the information provided, compare how elephants and humans are similar or different. Use a graphic organizer to record your ideas.

  •  

    Locate Africa and Asia on a map or globe. Find and name the other five continents.

  •  Use the book as a mentor text to create a non-fiction booklet on an animal of your choice.
  •  

    Notice the non-fiction features: “Read More,” “Web Sites” and “Index.” What do you find in each section? What is provided in place of a glossary? Is there a fiction section? How are elephants portrayed in books and movies? Are they endangered?

  •  

    Before reading, start a KWL chart. Fill in what you know about elephants and what you would like to learn. Read, then fill in what you have learned.

  •  

    Prepare five questions from the text and quiz a partner.

  •  Use the book as a mentor text to create a non-fiction booklet on an animal of your choice.
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Mathematics
  • Science and Technology