Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Crazy About Basketball!

Lesynski, Loris (Author)
Rasmussen, Gerry (Illustrator)
Annick Press 2013. 32 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9781554515417 (hardcover)
9781554515400 (paperback)
Original language: English
Dewey: 811
Book type: Anthology
Book genre: Poetry

Text Elements:

point of view, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

That’s how the basketball bounces: from the point of view of the fans, the players and even the ball, readers learn about one of the world’s most popular sports. The integration of facts into this series of poems is seamless and playful. For example, when James Naismith was first inspired to hang fruit baskets for his students to toss balls into, “They all agreed—but said, ‘We better/take the peaches out!’”

Written mostly in metered rhyming verse (there are also a few free-verse examples), these poems are percussive and accessible, each one hinging on some aspect of the sport, from the maple floors of basketball courts to the determination of a young girl who “trained her fingertips/for weeks and weeks and weeks” until—“who knew? It’s true/that strengthening/your fingers on the ball/makes every other part of you/get stronger overall.”

The abundant colour spot illustrations offer cartoonish counterpoints to the thematic content: a poem about the science of bouncing is portrayed by a lab full of balls, while a poem about height has a little boy standing before his much taller shadow. An accompanying website offers even more basketball poems and invites readers to write their own.

  •  Scan the poems for basketball-specific vocabulary. Make an illustrated glossary of terms to accompany the book.
  •  

    Choose a poem that reminds you of an experience you have had playing basketball. On sticky notes, annotate the poem to show your text-to-self connections.

  •  

    Work with a partner. Notice the use of font and punctuation in some of the poems. What clues do they give you about how to read the text? Read the poems together, using appropriate expression.

  •  

    As a group, brainstorm what you know about basketball. Make a class list of words related to this sport.

  •  

    Use information from the poems to create a word web about basketball.

  •  

    Create a basketball information booklet, in a comic strip style, to explain how basketball is played and how to improve your game. Use your prior knowledge and the information found in the book.

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To construct his/her identity
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use information
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Personal and Career Planning
  • Physical Education and Health