Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Counting on Fall

Flatt, Lizann (Author)
Barron, Ashley (Illustrator)
Owlkids 2012. 32 pages
First published: 2012
Series: Math in Nature
ISBN: 9781926973364 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 513
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

recurring patterns

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Couched in autumnal imagery, this picture book’s mathematical messages are nonetheless clearly conveyed. Directly addressing the reader, the book poses simple mathematical tasks, including counting by twos, fives and tens, and ordering. Each page is introduced with a question and features a particular species and autumnal animal activity: “If honk-honking geese/kept to groups ten apiece,/what a sight that would make/at the lake.” The unmetered verse of the what-if portions of narrative occasionally uses irregular end-rhyme, and the fall text is set apart from the more complicated mathematical instructions by font, size and placement.

The collage illustrations evoke the warm tones of fall and the many textures and layers of the natural world as it prepares to rest. In many of the more populous pages, such as the image with a hundred bats (the reader is asked to count how many are awake), the repetition of colours and shapes results in a trompe-l’oeil effect, while the layered collage sections create depth. Each two-page colour spread is a snapshot of the scene described: grackles nest in a cross-hatched deciduous tree; a field is furrowed after harvest; a black bear sprawls in a bush, snacking on seedpods.

“Nature Notes” at the end provide short informative paragraphs on the flora and fauna featured in the story.

  •  

    What is the meaning of estimate? Share some examples. Practise estimating as you read.

  •  

    Start a class anchor chart of math words from the book. Add to the list as more words are found.

  •  

    Try the math challenges suggested on each page. Discuss the different strategies you use to solve the problems.

  •  

    Look around your school for examples of places with potential math problems. Take a picture and formulate a question to accompany it. Assemble your pictures into a class book.

  •  

    Go through the book and discuss the different math concepts. Practise the exercises using a number chart when necessary.

  •  

    Create a class anchor chart of math words in the book. Add to the list as more words are found.

  •  

    Read the “Nature Notes” at the end. List the new animals in your reading log. Research the featured animals. Where can they be found? Locate their habitats on a map.

  •  Create math situations in the same style to share with other teams.
  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To communicate appropriately
  • To solve problems
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Mathematics
  • Science and Technology