Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

City Dog, Country Frog

Willems, Mo (Author)
Muth, Jon J. (Illustrator)
Disney/Hyperion Books 2010. 60 pages
First published: 2010
ISBN: 9781423103004 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

recurring patterns

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

When City Dog runs freely in the countryside for the first time in spring, he spots Country Frog sitting on a rock, waiting for a friend. “You’ll do,” says Frog, who invites him to play Country Frog games. Next time they meet, in summer, they play City Dog games. The ritual continues through fall and into winter, when things change forever for the unlikely pair.

Spare and poignant language is rich and rhythmic, as the rituals, and language, are repeated each season.

Full-bleed watercolour paintings vividly capture the seasonal landscapes and the corresponding expressions and behaviours of the animals. Each illustration appears on the right side of the page with the exception of one textless double spread, which features City Dog sitting small and alone on the rock in Country Frog’s frozen stream, hinting at City Dog’s sadness.

This gentle meditation on the natural course of friendship and life comes full circle with spring again, and the start of a budding new friendship.

  •  

    Discuss what made Dog and Frog’s friendship special. What do you think happened to frog over the winter? Why did dog smile a “froggy smile?

  •  

    Discuss the way the book is structured (cycle of seasons). Write an adventure for Dog and Squirrel using the same format.

  •  

    List the four seasons and specify how long each one lasts. Talk about other types of cycles (e.g. animals’ lives, the moon, a school day or a year).

  •  Discuss the friendship between the dog and the frog.
  •  

    Re-create the story as one about a dog and a chipmunk. With the text as a model, write about the first season as a whole class. The second season can be written in small groups, and the last two seasons done individually.

  •  

    Talk about activities we do with our friends throughout the four seasons. 

  •  

    Write and illustrate a four-season text about the activities you do with your friends, using the book as a model. 

  • To communicate appropriately
  • To construct his/her identity
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Ethics and Religious Culture
  • Geography, History and Citizenship