Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Cinder

Meyer, Marissa (Author)
Macmillan 2013. 402 pages
First published: 2012
Series: The Luner Chronicles
ISBN: 9781250007209 (paperback)
9780312641894 (hardcover)
9781466800113 (e-book)
Original language: English
Book type: Novel
Book genre: Dystopian

Text Elements:

characterization, multigenre, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Linh Cinder is a 16-year-old cyborg living in a dystopian future. She is a talented mechanic and runs a cyborg repair booth in the city centre, where a plague has taken hold. Even the Emperor has it, so a royal ball is organized to help Prince Kai find his Queen before becoming ruler of the land.

Cinder is a second-class citizen in both society and her adoptive family, and she is mortified when she unexpectedly meets Prince Kai when he brings his royal android for repair. She also becomes an experimental subject to find a cure for the plague, to which she is mysteriously immune. Meanwhile, the evil Lunar Queen Levana is trying to strike up a potentially disastrous strategic partnership between Earth and Luna.

The story stays close to the heroine cyborg’s point of view: “Cinder tensed, terrified that he would feel the hard metal, even through her gloves.… She mentally urged her robotic limb to go soft, to be pliant, to be human.” More than anything, Cinder longs to be seen as human, accepted for who she is.

With a strong female heroine and several enthralling plot lines, readers are caught between the pull of a love story and the tension of a high-stakes drama. This work of speculative fiction combines elements of well-known fairy tales and opens up new territory for science fiction. This is the first in a five-part series that takes up other fairy tale story arcs in Cinder’s quest to save earth, and Prince Kai, from Queen Levana.

  •  

    This fairy tale retelling explores issues surrounding race, class and gender as well as the limits of technology and politics. The opening scenes provide good fodder for group discussions.

  •  

    What type of story is this? In small groups, discuss the elements of the genre and, as a whole group, identify the conventions of the text.

  •  

    Following group discussions, select a topic or issue stemming from the story and do a quickwrite. Use the quickwrite and ideas from discussions to write a response to the novel.

  •  

    Create a mind map about the fairy tale, Cinderella, and its other main characters. Jot down key words for every character. Discuss how an author can adapt a fairy tale to make the characters interesting to an older audience.

  •  

    While reading, note any references that remind you of other well-known fairy tales. Explain why.

  •  

    Read the short story, “Glitches,” found at the end of the novel. Discuss and identify this text form. Write your own retelling of a fairy tale; make sure to include all the text components of a short story.

  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Science and Technology
  • Social Sciences