Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Chicks & Chickens

Gibbons, Gail (Author/Illustrator)
Holiday House 2005. 32 pages
First published: 2003
ISBN: 9780823419395 (paperback)
Original language: English
Dewey: 636.5
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

The origin of chickens (thought to be bred from jungle fowl of Southeast Asia), their free-range habits, and social organization (preening and pecking order), different breeds, anatomy, chicken-related vocabulary (coop, flock, brood) and a detailed portrayal of the chicken’s life-cycle are all packed into this deceptively simple-looking book.

Lively and bright watercolour illustrations dominate every spread, showing farm scenes in the yard and the coop. These may also incorporate simple anatomic diagrams or depict characteristics of various breeds. On every page, a few lines of large-size type can be read as a story: “In a few weeks the chicks are bigger, but their mother still protects them.” Pull-points on the images provide added information: “The first break in a shell is called a PIP.”

Of particular interest is the book’s differentiation between farm and factory (“small farm and large farm”) processes, as they raise chickens for eggs and for meat. There’s much here to learn, for readers of any age.

  •  

    As a group, brainstorm what you know about chicks and chickens, and what you would like to know. Use a KWL chart to note the information. As the book is read aloud, complete the chart.

  •  

    Use sticky notes to make tabs for the different sections of the book, making it easy to locate information. Label the tabs according to the content of the page or section.

  •  Write an acrostic, concrete or other type of poem about chickens. Incorporate facts from the text.
  •  Read one of the fiction books about chickens. Critique the portrayal of chickens in the story with actual chicken facts from the non-fiction text.
  •  

    As a group, brainstorm what you know about chicks and chickens, and what you would like to know. Use a KWL chart to note the information. As the book is read aloud, complete the chart.

  •  

    Use teacher-selected resources to learn about different kinds of eggs and chickens.

  •  

    Discuss how life for chickens may differ in small versus big farms. How about raising chickens at home? Do your city bylaws allow it? Should they?

  •  

    Chicken and eggs are common elements of the human diet. Explore how people around the world prepare them. Create a Chicken and Egg Cookbook. Choose simple recipes from other countries and add one you know from your family. Try one out.

  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Science and Technology