Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Canada’s Birds

Hughes, Susan (Author)
Scholastic Canada 2010. 52 pages
First published: 2010
Series: Canada Close-Up
ISBN: 9781443100014 (paperback)
Original language: English
Dewey: 598
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

layout, multimodal, setting, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

The intro to this book, which concentrates on 10 different birds of Canada, explains that as one of the biggest countries in the world, with “wetlands, mountains, prairies, woodlands, coasts and tundra ... more than four hundred species of birds call Canada home.”

The sentences are short and simple, but thorough, delving into the intimate details of each bird. “The downy woodpecker is built for digging insects out of wood. Its tongue is very long and has barbs on it. It is also covered with a gluey substance. Insects and insect eggs stick to it!” Some of the birds may be familiar (chickadee or raven) while others may be less so (killdeer or northern shoveler).

Photographs accompany each chapter, with some stunning images, such as a mother Ruby Throated Hummingbird feeding her tiny babies, or the bristled feet of the Ruffed Grouse, which “act like snowshoes to help the birds travel over the deep snow.”

There is an eclectic variation within the 10 species including migrators, meat eaters, seed lovers and snow dwellers. Facts include clever survival tricks (the Killdeer pretends to be hurt so as to lure predators away from her nest) and incredible facts (a hummingbird’s heart beats 250 times a minute.)

In this quick read, many surprising facts are presented and detailed photographs provide an ideal accompaniment. The diversity in the species featured is a reminder of the diversity of Canada.

  •  Brainstorm what you know about birds. Note the information on a class chart.
  •  Explore the structures and features of this book. Compare it to a more modern non-fiction text such as National Geographic Kids Everything Dolphins. Are there any features you would add to this book?
  •  

    The chickadee-dee-dee sound was the basis for naming the bird. Online, find the songbirds described in this book and listen to their calls. Try writing out the sounds they make.

  •  On a map of Canada, identify where these birds can be found.
  •  

    As the book is read, discuss the characteristics for each bird. Create a graphic organizer that will help you collect the important elements from this book.

  •  Brainstorm what you know about birds. Note the information on a class chart.
  •  

    Explore the structures and features of this book. Are there any features you would want to add?

  •  On a map of Canada, identify where these birds can be found.
  •  

    As the book is read, discuss the characteristics of each bird. Design a graphic organizer that will help you collect the important elements from this book.

  •  

    Identify birds found in your area. Learn their French and English names. Observe them and use teacher-selected resources to create a graphic organizer, poster or text in the same style as the book.

  •  

    With a partner, think of birds that are typically found in Canada only (or the northern United States). Check the table of contents and see how many you guessed. For each bird listed, discuss what you think they eat.

  •  

    As you read, think about where you may have seen each bird. Do the description and habits of the bird match what you witnessed? If you have never seen any of these birds, why do you think that is?

  •  

    Choose one of the birds and prepare a presentation about it. Conduct further research as needed, and include lots of images. Present your project to the class.

  • To adopt effective work methods
  • To communicate appropriately
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Science and Technology