Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Can You Make a Scary Face?

Thomas, Jan (Author/Illustrator)
Simon & Schuster 2009. 36 pages
First published: 2009
ISBN: 9781416985815 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, dialogue, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

A caricatured ladybug in bright neon, with a goofy grin and springy antennae, takes readers on a fun journey through movement and the imagination. It starts with an invitation: “Hey, you! Yes, I’m talking to you! STAND UP!” The ladybug then changes its mind a few times and demands that the reader sit down, then stand again. Things get really wild when the ladybug suggests the reader has swallowed a tiny insect and a chicken dance ensues. Finally, an enormous frog comes in the room and the reader is asked to make a scary face to chase it away. “YIKES! Not THAT scary!” The ladybug takes off in fright. With the frog.

Digital design depicts the bug in thick black outlines with brilliant coloured backgrounds of sky blue, tangerine and fuchsia. Each large speech bubble fills an entire page, with an illustration of the bug opposite. Language uses direct address and instructions. Text layout is as dynamic as the movements suggested, often employing capitals and red and green lettering.

Designed to be read aloud and to get children up on their feet and moving, this introduction to drama or dance is a hilarious adventure that will result in a good dose of the giggles.

  •  

    Brainstorm other faces people make (angry, confused, annoyed, etc.) and try out a few. Work with a partner and copy each other’s expressions.

  •  

    Describe or draw the tiny, tickly bug that you visualized. Compare your mental image with that of a partner.

  •  

    Identify the types of sentences as telling, asking or exclaiming. Use the punctuation as clues.

  •  

    Listen to the story as it is read aloud. Act it out and have someone take photos as you perform. Sequence the pictures and retell the story.

  •  

    With a partner, prepare cards with the action pictures (stand up, blow the bug out, make a scary face, etc.) and practise saying them. Prepare a humorous five-action routine to show your classmates.

  •  

    Discuss faces you could make to scare the frog away. Practise the language needed to describe your partner’s face (big eyes, tongue hanging out, hands over your ears, etc.). What other faces can you make?

  • Health and Well-Being
  • Dance
  • Drama