Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

C Is for Canada: Celebrating Our Nation

Ulmer, Mike (Author)
Daigneault, Sylvie (Illustrator)
Sleeping Bear Press 2017. 32 pages
First published: 2017
ISBN: 9781585369737 (hardcover)
9781634724418 (e-book)
Original language: English
Dewey: 971
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

recurring patterns, setting, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

From A (the aurora borealis that tints northern skies) to Z (zero, as in degrees), this picture book presents short, four-lines of rhyming verse that chronicle 26 aspects of traditional Canadiana. At once quaint and hyperbolic, the ABC book includes familiar standbys, such as beavers, maples leaves and Québec City (“A stone fort called the Citadelle,/a grand and wonderful hotel,/walls to climb, an aquarium to see— /Québec is the perfect city for me!”), alongside more surprising inclusions, such as rock rabbits or underwear (“We treasure pretty Truro,/I think we always will./That’s where they make the long johns/that protect us from the chill.”) With several provinces and territories represented, the book has a focus on wildlife, tourist attractions and symbols such as hockey and military recognition.

The bright pencil illustrations provide spot and full-page representative renderings of the theme for each letter: Alberta’s dinosaurs are illustrated by a toddling carnivore; “G is for Gravy” is a dripping box of poutine; Anne Shirley contemplates Green Gables while perched on a red sand cliff complete with lighthouse in “I is for Island Hymn;” while Peary caribou (standard-bearers for the letter P) frolic in a two-page spread, complete with grassy field and looming glaciers.

The book concludes with a more in-depth letter-by-letter explanation of each letter’s topic.

  •  

    Based on the title, brainstorm an alphabetical list of things that you think are definitively Canadian. As you read, compare your list to that of the book.

  •  

    In groups, choose one of the featured Canadian landmarks for further research. Present your findings to the class using a slideshow, multimedia presentation or other format.

  •  

    Choose a Canadian landmark, event or icon that is not in the book. Write a stanza describing it in the same style as the author. Make an illustrated page and add it to a class book.

  •  

    With a partner, make an alphabox of words you know that represent Canada.

  •  

    On a map of Canada, find the locations mentioned and add sticky notes to encapsulate the representative elements. Do you agree with the author's choices?

  •  

    Read the endnotes to better understand the representative Canadian elements.

  •  

    As a whole group, review the ideas from the alphaboxes. Decide on the best elements to produce a new class book about Canada, using a similar style. Work in pairs, writing about two letters each.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Geography, History and Citizenship