Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Brave Chicken Little

Byrd, Robert (Author/Illustrator)
Penguin Random House 2014. 32 pages
First published: 2014
ISBN: 9780670786169 (hardcover)
9780698144897 (e-book)
Original language: English
Dewey: 398.2
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, recurring patterns, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

On his way to the market, Chicken Little is bonked on the head by a falling acorn. As the traditional story goes, he deduces that the sky is falling and runs to tell the king. Along the way, he meets his friend Henny Penny. They run into Ducky Lucky, then they come across Turkey Lurkey, and so on, until the whole panicking band of animals is headed to the castle. Finally, they come across Foxy Loxy, who intimates that he too will join them on their mission. First, he invites them to his house for brunch, or rather, he invites them to be brunch. Locked in the cellar, the animals can’t think what to do, until brave Chicken Little finds a solution, tricks the foxes and sets his friends free.

The simple story is told in musical language and the dialogue is memorably repeated every time Chicken Little meets another of his friends. The use of rhyme both in the narrative and in the animals’ names is playful and whimsical. When Foxy Loxy brings Chicken Little and his friends to his house, he introduces his children—“These are my kits, who frazzle my wits”—and proceeds to name all seven, from “Foxy Boxy” to “Foxy Soxy.”

The colour pencil drawings portray in elaborate detail the inviting world of Chicken Little: his home, his journey and his animal friends and foes.

  •  

    Explore the book cover and note the characters (animals) and setting. Make predictions about the story. As the book is read aloud, adjust your predictions.

  •  

    Choral read the story, joining in on the repetitive patterns.

  •  

    Notice the characters’ names. Create some new characters with similarly rhyming names and draw or describe them.

  •  

    If you were a character in the story, who would you be? Write or draw your idea of what happens to your character after the story ends.

  •  

    In groups, devise a new ending to the story and present your version to the class in a short skit.

  •  Explore the book cover to observe the animals in the story and the setting. Make predictions about the story. As the story is read aloud, adjust your predictions.
  •  

    Observe the characters’ names: how are they built? How is their name related to their personality?

  •  

    Choral read the story and join in with the repetitive patterns.

  •  

    In pairs, create a mind map of the story. Compare your map with another team’s and adjust the information as needed.

  •  Retell the story using drama.
  • To construct his/her identity
  • To cooperate with others
  • To use creativity
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life