Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Bounced

Staunton, Ted (Author)
Scholastic Canada 2017. 166 pages
First published: 2017
ISBN: 9781443157179 (paperback)
9781443157186 (e-book)
Original language: English
Book type: Novel
Book genre: Realistic

Text Elements:

characterization, conflict, dialogue, point of view, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

When Duncan witnesses the latest bank heist by the Borsalino Bandit, his detective instincts prick up: “this would be a good chance to see how the cops operated—even though I knew from the stories that amateurs and private eyes were almost always smarter.” This light-hearted mystery follows the adventures of Grade Six students Duncan, CC and Zal, as they solve the case and catch the bandit.

Throughout the tale, creative writing is examined through Duncan’s own interest in reading and writing stories. In ‘appendixes,’ the voice of Duncan discusses his own plot outlines and revisions.

Conversational language skillfully conveys the voice of a bright, observant pre-teen: “Barely an hour had gone by. In that time I’d skipped school … caught a caiman, gotten soaked, lied to stay off TV and wrecked my phone.”

The clues lead Duncan close to home, which is somehow connected to the identity of the bank robber: “I had more mysteries than it was probably healthy to have. Was Aunt Jenn lying about Lamar Del Ray? What flipped her out about Marty Raymond?” As Duncan and his friends solve the case through sleuthing and deducing—and a few errant reptiles—he learns a whole lot more about his own family.

  •  

    This novel can be thought of as a detective story “how-to.” Duncan offers readers critical observations about detective stories and, as the story progresses, the reader is brought along on his mini-inquiry into crime novels. Note the information he provides, both through his observations and in his writing life.

  •  

    In small reading groups, consider Duncan as a protagonist. Explore how he is characterized through words and actions. Compare Duncan with more conventional heroes in crime and detective stories.

  •  

    The text may be used to introduce detective stories as a genre. In conjunction with other texts, create and maintain a list of genre conventions in your reader-writer’s notebook to spark the production process for detective narratives.

  •  

    Do you believe lizards or reptiles make good pets? In a small group, share and discuss your opinions.

  •  

    As you read, look for clues as to who the Borsalino Bandit might be.

  •  

    With a partner, write and shoot a trailer video for the book. Screen it for your class.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To use information
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Personal and Career Planning
  • Personal Development
  • Social Sciences