Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Beavers

Gibbons, Gail (Author/Illustrator)
Holiday House 2013. 32 pages
First published: 2013
ISBN: 9780823424122 (hardcover)
9780823431847 (paperback)
9780823429912 (e-book)
Original language: English
Dewey: 599.37
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

layout, multimodal, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Canadians may think they know a thing or two about beavers. Beavers splash their tails when they’re threatened and build dams to build ponds. But did you know that beavers never stop growing? (The largest on record weighs 115 pounds). Did you know that beavers have oil glands that make their skin waterproof and a second set of eyelids that open and close sideways? And double nails on their hind feet for grooming?

The book provides many fascinating details about this iconic animal, with detailed drawings that include close-up views of a beaver’s anatomy, the complex interior of their homes, and their surrounding habitat.

“Beavers show affection or greet other beavers by nibbling the other beavers’ cheeks.” These and other facts are presented in an easy-to-understand manner. The sentences are simple and the accompanying naturalistic drawings illustrate almost every fact.

“Beavers have enemies. Their greatest enemies are humans.” The book finishes with information about how beavers’ habitats have been threatened by land development. It highlights the importance of beavers in the creation of wetlands and the need to preserve these natural spaces.

  •  Use a RAN chart (Reading and Analyzing Non-fiction texts) and brainstorm what you know about beavers. Fill in the “Wondering” column.
  •  

    As you read, adjust your RAN chart to recognize new learning and misconceptions. Continue to fill in the Wondering column.

  •  

    Use this text as a model to do your own research on another animal. Consider the animal’s body, habitat and eating habits, how it communicates and its family life. Is it an endangered animal? Choose a creative way to express the results of your research.

  •  Use a RAN chart (Reading and Analyzing Non-fiction texts) and brainstorm what you know about beavers. Fill in the “Wondering” column.
  •  

    Explore the book and note how the different fonts, titles, diagrams and pictures help you understand the information.

  •  As you read the book, adjust your RAN chart to recognize new learning and misconceptions. Continue to fill in the “Wondering” column.
  •  

    What are wetlands and why are they important? Are there any in your area that need protection?

  •  

    Why do you think the beaver was selected as Canada's emblem? What other emblems exist for Canada and Québec? Choose an emblem for yourself or for your class. What characteristics does this emblem have that represent you?

  •  

    Skim through the pages (in 60 seconds or less.) With a partner, recall the characteristics of beavers mentioned in the book.

  •  

    While you read, pay careful attention to new information you learn about beavers. Is it surprising or expected?

  •  

    Prepare and give an informative presentation about beavers based on what you have read. Be sure to include images from additional sources to accompany the text.

  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Science and Technology