Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Beatrice Doesn’t Want To

Munsinger, Lynn (Illustrator)
Candlewick Press 2008. 32 pages
First published: 1981
ISBN: 9780763638436 (paperback)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This story conveys one pup’s slow entrance into the world of reading, while skillfully portraying relationship dynamics between younger and older siblings. They argue about everything, including a visit to the library, “‘You have to,’ said Henry. ‘I don’t want to!’ Beatrice told him.”

Funny, expressive illustrations in watercolour effects depict the dog-characters in home and library settings. A series of spot illustrations show Beatrice, a young dog, trailing after her big brother Henry, from bookcase to bookcase. Beatrice exudes adoration as she clings to Henry’s leg, while he covers his face in frustration. “You’re driving me crazy!” Beatrice’s tears, bargaining and pestering result in banishment to the children’s room. One image shows her arms across her chest, as another dog leans over, with a hilariously winsome expression and says: “‘This is the second time I’ve heard this story.’ ‘Big deal!’ said Beatrice.”

The gift of reading—of identifying with a new world—is charmingly captured in Beatrice’s first real engagement with a book. Nose buried in the pages, her little paws dangle from a comfy armchair. “Come on, Bea,’ Henry said. ‘I don’t want to,’ Beatrice said.”

  •  

    Examine the book cover. Make predictions about what Beatrice doesn’t want to do. What is her reason for not wanting to do it?

  •  

    How did you come to enjoy books? Were you alone or with a friend, a teacher or a parent? Turn and talk with a partner about what brought reading into your life and share a favourite memory of reading.

  •  

    Go for a picture walk and observe each character’s attitudes. Discuss how body language expresses feelings and attitudes.

  •  Retell the story with a partner. Create a storyboard and then act it out for another pair of students.
  •  

    From the book cover, make predictions about what Beatrice doesn’t want to do.

  •  

    Go for a picture walk and observe the different characters’ attitudes. Discuss how body language expresses feelings and attitudes.

  •  As the book is read aloud, discuss how Beatrice starts paying attention and getting interested in books.
  •  

    Discuss how Henry and Beatrice take care of each other. How can you be helpful (or unhelpful) when someone else is working on a task near you? Use a class graphic organizer to note your ideas. Discuss how this relates to class and home tasks.

  •  Retell the story or act it out.
  • To construct his/her identity
  • To cooperate with others
  • Personal and Career Planning
  • Science and Technology