Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Bat Loves the Night

Davies, Nicola (Author)
Fox-Davies, Sarah (Illustrator)
Candlewick Press 2004. 32 pages
First published: 2001
Series: Read and Wonder
ISBN: 9780763624385 (paperback)
Original language: English
Dewey: 595.4
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

A fuzzy brown bat wakes up: it is time for her day—er, night—to begin. Using evocative and poetic structures, the language seamlessly introduces bat facts into the story: “Bat shouts as she flies, louder than a hammer blow, higher than a squeak.” In many spreads, simple captions expand on notions that are introduced in the main storyline: “A bat can eat dozens of big moths in a single night—or thousands of tiny flies, gnats . . . .”

Watercolour illustrations provide informative details as well as an atmospheric beauty. Bat’s fur looks touchable; a moth’s wing-veins bulge from their papery surface. Giant night-blooms, shadowy trees and still waters provide the landscapes of the little bat’s hunting grounds.

Children will enjoy her “gliding and fluttering” journey, as Bat “plunges” and “dives” though her nighttime adventures. They may appreciate even more her return to the roost, where dozens of furry, flightless batlings wait for their mothers’ warmth and milk. Cozy together, Bat and her baby doze, until another night begins.

  •  

    Survey the class to find out who likes bats. Graph the results, then read the book. Did anyone change their mind after reading? If so, why? Talk about the myths surrounding bats.

  •  

    Create a poster about bats. Include a Did You Know? section that highlights any new information you learned from your reading.

  •  

    Research and create a list of nocturnal animals. Create a separate list of animals that use echolocation. Which ability would you prefer to have? Debate the pros and cons of each one.

  •  Discuss the book’s structures and features. Identify the fiction and non-fiction elements of this book.
  •  Do a KWL chart about bats. Complete and correct your information after you have read the book. Highlight other questions you may have. 
  •  

    Discuss the book's structures and features. How is it a work of both fiction and non-fiction? 

  •  Compare the bat with another animal such as a mouse, a bird or a squirrel. How are they similar or different? 
  •  

    Hunt for the action verbs and put them in alphabetical order. How else could you organize these verbs? 

  •  

    Find the descriptive adjectives. Use them to describe something else (beady eyes, extra-long fingers, etc.).

  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Science and Technology