Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

B Is for Bookworm: A Library Alphabet

Prieto, Anita C. (Author)
Graef, Renée (Illustrator)
Sleeping Bear Press 2007. 40 pages
First published: 2005
ISBN: 9781585363261 (paperback)
9781585361458 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 027
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

Within the familiar structure of an alphabet book, this book addresses the history, functions and value of libraries, for confident readers.

“A is for Author,” “B is for Bookworm,” “C is for Library Card”: every letter features a library-related tidbit, with heading paragraphs and detailed sidebars. Readers will learn about the invention of the Dewey decimal system (“D”), and the origins of printing (“G is for Gutenberg”). They’ll learn about the U.S. Library of Congress, book categories (“Juvenile,” “Chapter books” and “Young Adult”), how to read call numbers and much, much more.

Realistic images in warm tones and soft edges evoke quiet study and community fun alike. In one image, a cross-legged scribe unravels his papyrus (“E is for Early Books”). In another, children gaze up at a lively librarian, reading from a picture book (“S is for storytelling”).

The value of books and libraries cannot be overstated, for readers of any age. This book offers an informative and attractive method for encouraging young people to enjoy all the benefits of these precious resources: “Just remember, once you’ve discovered your neighborhood library and met the librarian, you’ve found a lifelong friend!”

  •  

    Before reading, make small group predictions about the library vocabulary you will encounter. Confirm your predictions as you read.

  •  

    Go on a library scavenger hunt for the various terms (card, Library of Congress, etc.). Add other terms that arise as you search.

  •  

    With a library-as-media-centre in mind, brainstorm an A to Z class list of words related to communication technology. Work in pairs to produce double-page spreads.

  •  

    Before reading, make small group predictions about the library vocabulary you will encounter. Confirm your predictions as you read.

  •  Use the information to build a timeline of the history of books.
  •  

    Under the letter U, you can find useful elements of a book. Check several other books to see if they contain these elements. Which books have the most?

  •  

    With a library-as-media-centre in mind, brainstorm an A to Z class list of words related to communication technology. Work in pairs to produce double-page spreads.

  •  

    Before reading, list small group predictions about the A to Z library vocabulary you will encounter. Confirm your predictions as you read. What additional words could have been included?

  •  

    Go on a scavenger hunt around the school building and grounds to collect school-themed words. Take photos, if possible.

  •  

    In small groups, use your collected words and photos to create an alphabet book (with a letter, word and informational text for each letter). Include an appropriate cover and title. Share with elementary students.

  • To cooperate with others
  • To use information
  • To use information and communications technologies
  • Visual Arts