Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

An Egg Is Quiet

Aston, Dianna (Author)
Long, Sylvia (Illustrator)
Chronicle Books 2006. 32 pages
First published: 2006
ISBN: 9780811844284 (hardcover)
9781452131481 (paperback)
Original language: English
Dewey: 591.4
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

From tiny hummingbird eggs to giant ostrich eggs, oval ladybug eggs to tubular dogfish eggs, this book features over 60 types of eggs in many colours, shapes and sizes. Readers will discover that eggs can be cleverly camouflaged, surprisingly textured and sometimes, even fossilized. As a lap-book or a classroom read-aloud, this evocative and informative celebration of eggs will spark lively questions and observations.

The main text, in large, cursive script, provides basic information (“An egg is textured”) while more detailed information appears alongside, in smaller print (“Amphibian eggs are gooey. The ‘goo’ keeps them from drying out.”)

Finely detailed ink and watercolour illustrations capture not only the beauty and variety of the showcased eggs, but also their natural habitats: gnarly branches and vines or gritty beach sand. Swirly script, soft hues, double spreads that almost breathe—all contribute to the book’s elegant design.

Children will enjoy the book’s built-in game—matching the colourful eggs found on the front endpapers with the adult animals featured at the end.

  •  

    Choose any animal that lays eggs. Create a timeline that reflects the days/weeks/months needed for that animal to develop and subsequently hatch. See the model on the “An egg is giving” page.

  •  

    Discuss the attributes of a table of contents. Create one for this book. Why would a table of contents be beneficial in this case?

  •  

    Choose an egg featured in the book. Find out what the animal will look like once hatched and create a poster about it, listing its unique features.

  •  

    Note the vocabulary needed to describe the eggs. Add the words to a class anchor chart.

  •  

    Look at the various birds’ names and find their pictures at the end of the book. Which of these birds can you find in your area? 

  •  

    Research the birds that live in your area. Find pictures of the birds, their eggs and their English names. Make a bird anchor chart to post in the class. 

  •  

    Many of these eggs look marbelized. Look up different ways of decorating eggs for a spring celebration such as Easter. Try out different styles with a friend. Explain your process to others.

  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Science and Technology
  • Visual Arts