Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Actual Size

Jenkins, Steve (Author/Illustrator)
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2011. 32 pages
First published: 2004
ISBN: 9780547512914 (paperback)
Original language: English
Dewey: 591.4
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

character, point of view, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

From the tiny dwarf goby to the fold-out jaws of the man-eating saltwater crocodile, children will be fascinated by these actual-size portraits of a wide variety of animals. They will gaze into the eye of a giant squid. They may place their hand against the palm of a gorilla. Brief captions include statistics for each animal: “This is too close to a great white shark! length: 21 feet . . . weight: 6,000 pounds . . . teeth: 4 inches long.” Youngsters can compare the weights and measurements of animals from their own environment.

Paper cut-out illustrations use both painted and paper textures to build animal portraits that combine artistry with realism. Watercolour markings mimic the Goliath frog’s skin; cut-out shapes depict his articulations. Fibrous black paper creates the stripes on the Siberian tiger’s roaring face. The pygmy mouse lemur clings to a paint-stroke branch.

Back pages show thumbnail illustrations of the animals in their entirety, with further information on each one. Altogether, this book offers an ingenious approach for engaging young animal-lovers’ imaginations.

  •  

    Measure the length of the illustrated animal body parts.Write the measurements on sticky notes and place them right on the page (e.g. The ostrich’s eye measures __cm.).

  •  

    Brainstorm a list of other animals. Create a BIG class book with these animals using cut and torn paper (the same technique as the author). Include one or two facts about each animal.

  •  

    Which animal in the book is the fiercest? Scariest? Creepiest? Brainstorm other adjectives to describe the animals.

  •  

    Discuss the animals according to criteria: large or small? Scary or dangerous? A good pet or not?

  •  

    Use a graphic organizer to classify the animals as larger or smaller than yourself.

  •  

    Arrange the creatures in the book from smallest to largest.

  •  

    Which animal in the book is the weirdest? Fastest? Creepiest? Brainstorm other adjectives to describe the animals.

  • To construct his/her identity
  • To use information
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Mathematics
  • Science and Technology
  • Visual Arts