Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

Aaaarrgghh, Spider!

Monks, Lydia (Author/Illustrator)
Egmont 2007. 32 pages
First published: 2004
ISBN: 9781405210447 (paperback)
Original language: English
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

character, point of view, recurring patterns, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

A lonely spider desperately wants to be somebody’s pet and tries everything she can think of to befriend her chosen family. Unfortunately, her tactics have the opposite effect. Tossed outdoors, she dejectedly spins some enchanting webs, after which the family caves in and adopts her. A hilarious twist at the end will have readers chuckling, when spider decides to “introduce them to all my friends.”

The opening spread immediately catches the attention of readers who will wonder why the pictured family is upside-down. Once it is understood that the point of view is that of the spider narrating the story, reader interest is sustained through bold and vibrant artwork using bright colours, strong lines and spiderwebs of silver glitter.

Repetitive language patterns (“Look at me! Watch me dance/wash/eat/shop”) simplify the text for beginning readers. A predictable, recurrent chorus in dark boldface type (“Aaaarrgghh, spider! Out you go!”) encourages children to participate in the telling.

This fun story can certainly serve as a playful introduction to the concept of point of view and the use of punctuation.

  •  

    Tally the number of students who are fond of or afraid of spiders. Fill in a KWL chart. Refer to non-fiction books on spiders to find the answers to your questions.

  •  

    Define the word clever. List the ways that the spider thought she was being clever. Do you agree with the parents who thought her spider webs were so clever? Justify your answers.

  •  

    With so many friends, explain why the spider wanted to be someone’s pet. List the advantages and disadvantages of being a pet.

  •  

    Survey the class and record their answers to the following question: Do you think spiders make good pets? List the characteristics of a great pet.

  •  

    Create a want ad for the pet of your choice.

  •  

    Look at the pictures from the book and imagine the story. Discuss the vocabulary. 

  •  

    Discuss spiders: their appearance, where they live and what they eat.

  •  Listen to the story and join in as the book is read. Pay attention to the intonation. 
  •  Retell the story with your classmates. 
  •  

    Learn and sing “Itsy Bitsy Spider” as a companion song.

  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Science and Technology