Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

A Walk in Paris

Rubbino, Salvatore (Author/Illustrator)
Candlewick Press 2014. 40 pages
First published: 2014
ISBN: 9780763669843 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 944
Book type: Non-Fiction

Text Elements:

setting, structures and features

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

A day’s sightseeing provides the framework for this illustrated homage to the City of Light. Quaint illustrations of flattened forms and expressive line recall naïve art, while depicting landmarks (such as Notre-Dame, the Louvre, and the Pompidou Centre), markets and plazas (Maubert Mutualité Market, Place St-Michel) and aspects of Parisian culture (bistro dining, buying pastries and enjoying Tuileries Gardens).

Told in the voice of a little girl, simple language delivers the narrative: “The sky’s getting dark when we come up from the Métro. Grandpa buys me a souvenir from the kiosk at the station.” Captions scattered across each scene offer a wide range of facts, encouraging readers to browse: “Napoleon crowned himself emperor at Notre-Dame in 1804;” “Parisian waiters are highly trained professionals.”

An engaging resource for any library of human geography, this book finishes on a sweet note: “‘Can we come back one day?’ I ask Grandpa as we leave. ‘I’d like that,’ he says.”

  •  

    Examine the maps of Paris on both endpapers. Identify the familiar and unfamiliar landmarks. Start a list of things to see in Paris.

  •  

    Browse through the book, noticing the structure and features of each page. How will you read the factual information? The narrative text? Do you prefer to read them separately or at the same time?

  •  In groups, select one of the neighbourhoods or landmarks for further research. Create a brochure or promotional video for your “place” using information from the book and online resources.
  •  

    Make a class book of your community, in the same style. Include a narrative thread; feature landmarks and attractions you think are important.

  •  Brainstorm what you know about Paris.
  •  

    Explore the book’s structures and features. Go for a picture walk. What landmarks do you recognize? Why do you think different fonts are used throughout the book?

  •  

    Compare the landmarks in this book with those portrayed by Julie Kraulis in An Armadillo in Paris. How are the two books similar and different?

  •  

    Brainstorm landmarks in your neighbourhood. Create a fiction and non-fiction walk through it, using a similar style. Use maps and photographs or drawings to complete your work. Offer your product to a local tourist information centre.

  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To use information
  • To use information and communications technologies
  • Citizenship and Community Life
  • Geography, History and Citizenship