Logo Title Quebec Reading Connection

A Cool Drink of Water

Kerley, Barbara (Author)
National Geographic Society 2006. 32 pages
First published: 2002
ISBN: 9780792254898 (paperback)
9780792267232 (hardcover)
Original language: English
Dewey: 363.6
Book type: Picture Book

Text Elements:

point of view, setting

Reading Range

 
Cycle
Elementary
Secondary
 
1
2
3
1
2
ELA
K
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
3
4
5
ESL Intensive & Enriched
5
6
1
2
3
4
5

Description:

This beautiful, simple and sophisticated book will help readers of all skill levels look at water from a fresh perspective.

Dazzling images expand on the simple messages in the text. In one spread, a South Asian mother drops water into her child’s mouth, to the words “Shared in a FAMILY.” Against a burning background, a man in a gas mask offers his bottled water to a horse, “Shared with a FRIEND.” The photos are a rich source for discussion about water supply and diversity around the world.

Important nouns are printed in capital letters; key verbs and adjectives are italicized. Students may be encouraged to create their own similar sentences on a range of themes.

The material at the end of the book includes a world map, highlighting all the places the photos were shot, as well as an informative caption for each photo. “A note on water conservation” includes evocative quotes from diverse sources, and will be much appreciated by confident readers.

  •  

    Discuss the importance of water in our world.

  •  Make a list of all the things that need water in order to live, or that are made using water.
  •  

    Create a poster reminding people how they can save water every day at home and school (don’t leave taps running, take shorter showers, etc.).

  •  

    With a partner, study one photograph from the book. What do you notice? Using clues from the photograph, write down as much as you can about the place. Use critical thinking to draw conclusions.

  •  

    Learn about the water cycle. List the bodies of water near your school community (e.g. seaway, river, lake).

  •  Discuss the importance of water in our world. Use a KWL chart to record the information.
  •  Make a list of all the things that need water in order to live, or that are produced using water.
  •  

    Create a poster reminding people how they can save water every day at home and school (don’t leave taps running, take shorter showers, etc.).

  •  Read a picture with a partner. Look carefully at one photograph from the book. What do you notice? Using clues from the photograph write down as much as you can about the place. What conclusions can you draw?
  •  Write about the different ways you can get a cool drink of water. Illustrate or take pictures of someone drinking water in these ways.
  •  As a class, scan the book (without reading) and select three photos. Using a T-chart for each photo, write both positive and negative words evoked by the images. Compare your ideas with a partner and add to your chart.
  •  Choose one of the featured locations and research statistics on its water consumption and conservation measures. Collate an infographic book that will display your collective research. Discuss and reach consensus on how to order the pages from the best water conservationists to the worst.
  •  Be a water conservation activist. Choose a medium through which you will educate your school about the value of water and how to conserve it.
  • To cooperate with others
  • To exercise critical judgment
  • To solve problems
  • Environmental Awareness and Consumer Rights and Responsibilities
  • Health and Well-Being
  • Geography, History and Citizenship
  • Science and Technology